CONFÉRENCE DE DROIT PUBLIC

FACULTÉ DE DROIT | UNIVERSITÉ D’OTTAWA | 17 au 19 JUIN 2020

  • Farrah Ahmed (Melbourne), “Arbitrariness: Duties and Powers”
  • Erika Arban (Melbourne), “Unpacking the Concept of Divided Sovereignty in Federal and Quasi-Federal States: the Cases of Canada, India and Sri Lanka”
  • Michael Asimow (Santa Clara, UCLA), “Charging Decisions in Combined Function Agencies”
  • Angela Cameron (Ottawa), “Gendering Impact Benefit Agreements”
  • Eoin Carolan (University College Dublin), “Re-considering the Scope and Limits of Executive Power: The Challenge of the New ‘Elective Dictatorship’?”
  • Kenny Chng (Singapore Management University), “Norms of Good Administration in Relation to Legitimate Expectations – A Search for Clarity Through Moral and Legal Philosophy”
  • Eddie Clark (Wellington), “Citizen Rights and State Legitimacy: The Purpose(s) of Judicial Review”
  • Donal Coffey (Max Planck Frankfurt), “Provincialism and Federalism in Commonwealth Constitutional Thought”
  • Aimée Craft (Ottawa), “Legal Personhood of Lake of the Woods: Finding the Right Boat to Navigate the Murky Jurisdictional Waters”
  • Paul Daly (Ottawa), “Artificial Administration: How Public Law Should Respond to the Age of Machines”
  • Érik Labelle Eastaugh (Moncton), “The Justiciability of Socio-Economic Rights: The Neglected Case of Language Rights”
  • Alexandra Flynn (UBC), ”Indigenous-municipal Legal Relationships”
  • Kate Glover (Western), “Structural Administrative Constitutionalism”
  • Mario Gomez (International Centre for Ethnic Studies, Sri Lanka), “Gender Equality and the Politics of Law Reform in Malaysia and Sri Lanka”
  • Sari Graben (Ryerson), “Gendering Impact Benefit Agreements”
  • Jelena Gligorijević (Australian National University)(Cambridge), “Parliamentary Privilege: Right, Duty or Power?”
  • Harry Hobbs (University of Technology Sydney), “First Nations, Settler Parliaments and the Question of Consultation: Approaches in Canada, Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand”
  • Makoto Hong (Attorney General’s Chambers, Singapore), “Devolution of Powers in the Digital Age: Automated Decision-Making and the future of the Carltona Principle”
  • Swati Jhaveri (National University of Singapore), “Bureaucratic Power and Public Law Theory”
  • Howard Kislowicz (Calgary), “Law, Faith, and Interpretation”
  • Kathryn E. Kovacs (Rutgers), “Presidential Power and Conditional Congressional Delegations”
  • Philippe Lagassé (Carleton), “Toward a Post-Responsible Government Constitution in the United Kingdom”
  • Mary Liston (UBC), “A Long Time Ago in the Future: Judicial Review of Indigenous Decision-Makers in Three Common Law Jurisdictions”
  • Pui Yin Lo (Hong Kong), “Protecting Fundamental Rights under a Constitution: The Case for Preferring an uneven/multi-furcated Approach over a Coherence Scheme”
  • Alissa Malkin (Justice Canada), “Dealing with the Internet in a Federal Structure: Who Can Do What?”
  • Marie Manikis, “Victims as Agents of Accountability: A Comparative Understanding of the Victim’s Conception and Role in England and Wales and the United States”
  • Richard Martin (Oxford), “In Pursuit of ‘Ethical Duties’: A Comparative Analysis of the Courts’ Interpretations of Statutory Duties on Public Authorities to Realise Human Rights and Equality in Victoria and England”
  • Carissima Mathen (Ottawa), “Two Kinds of Arbitrariness”
  • Jena McGill (Ottawa), “Why Global Constitutionalism Needs Feminism”
  • Dan Meagher (Deakin), “The Principle of Legality in Anglo-Australian Law: Unified Common Law Protection of Fundamental Rights or Ships Passing in the Night?”
  • Richard Moon (Windsor), “Does Free Speech Have a Future”
  • Sarah Morales (Victoria), “Gendering Impact Benefit Agreements”
  • Shireen Morris (Melbourne), “Mikisew Cree and the Canadian Duty to Consult: Lessons for a First Nations Voice in Australia”
  • Hillary Nye (Alberta), “One Reasonable Answer? Deference, Moral Questions, and the Duty to Get Things Right”
  • Jennifer Raso (Alberta), “Rule of Law, Rule of Code? Fair Processes in Public Law and Computer Science”
  • Rolien Roos (North Western University, South Africa), "Is Procedural State Liabililty Law in Need of Reconsideration?"
  • Dian A H Shah (National University of Singapore), “Gender Equality and the Politics of Law Reform in Malaysia and Sri Lanka”
  • Bradley Slade (Stellenbosch), “The Role of the Courts in Interpreting the Legislature’s Duty to Hold the Executive Accountable: Reflections from South Africa”
  • Joanne Smith (McGill),  “First Nations Put Last: An Examination of the Duties and Power of Courts to Recognize Indigenous Consultation Rights following Mikisew Cree”
  • Jocelyn Stacey (UBC), “Climate Emergency Declarations: Legal Disruption, Emergency Powers and the Rule of Law”
  • Shona Wilson Stark (Cambridge), “Human Rights: The Latest Power Struggle in the UK’s Constitution”
  • Stefan Theil (Oxford), “Unconstitutional Prorogation”
  • Jason N E Varuhas (Melbourne), “Public Law Values: A Critique”
  • Jacob Weinrib (Queen’s), “Positive Rights: Rights to What?”
  • Hanna Wilberg (Auckland), “Public Authority Duties of Care: Individual or Systemic?”
  • Lael K Weis (Melbourne), “Bifurcation in Rights Analysis”
  • Denise Wong (Attorney General’s Chambers, Singapore), “Devolution of Powers in the Digital Age: Automated Decision-Making and the future of the Carltona Principle”
  • Wade Wright (Western), “Neglecting Overlapping Power: Insights from Canada’s Interprovincial Pipeline Controversy”